Wüsthof

Cutlery!  Another cutlery article on the internet!

No, it isn’t.  There’s millions of those already.  And they always follow this formula:

Good knives are important because bla bla bla steel grade tempering craftsmanship.  You obviously appreciate a good quality knife because you’re super discerning with your l337 culinary skilzzz.  There’s Japanese and German style knives–which are best for you?  I will provide you the main differences in a cookie cutter paragraph repeated verbatim across every link on the search results first page.  And here’s an arbitrary list of expensive knife manufacturers that I found online, too, with convenient links to Amazon.  Of course I’ve used them all, at $100-$600,000 per blade, that’s totally believable.  I swear I know what I’m talking about.  I’m an expert.  (We may earn a commission on the included affiliate links.  And by using this site you agree to internet marketing trackers, I mean cookies, which need to be enabled for the best experience.)

Nay!  This is simply me bragging about my own collection!

Liz bought me a couple knives from the Wüsthof Classic Ikon line.  And after using them I immediately decided that the cheap Cuisinart collection I’d had since college needed to be retired.  And with the help of some gift cards granted to me for completing a major project at work I now have these:

The scissors are not high-end, however. That need still escapes me.

That is all.

Or I could now transition to knife technique, as if people really don’t intuitively know how to grasp a knife in different ways for control vs power, as the multitude of professional (utility-grade line cooks as Applebee’s) chefs seem to think of the masses.

Or there’s always the flame wars regarding sharpening techniques…

–Simon

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